About Me

Alaska Summer: Habitat for Humanity
Alaska Summer: Habitat for Humanity

Hi!  My name is Ambre Lee and I’ve been teaching in Special Education since 2008.  I’m a full-time SDC English teacher at a large charter school in Granada Hills, CA.  My teaching philosophy is that every kid can and wants to be actively engaged in learning.

As Special Education teachers, we are constantly rewarded with the joy of helping struggling students navigate their academic life.  At the same time, juggling case-carrier responsibilities on top of the tremendous hey-I’m-a-teacher workload can feel overwhelming and even isolating.

I want this blog to celebrate the wonderful job we all do and provide insight, inspiration, and support in the areas that we all find difficult to manage.  After some thought, I felt the task could be divided into Five areas:

  • Motivation
  • Teaching
  • Case-Carrier Responsibilities
  • Paraprofessionals
  • Current Research
Using primary sources at the Folger’s Institute Research Library to develop lesson plans.

Teacher Blogs: The Next Generation of Collaboration

Establishing and maintaining a professional teacher blog enables teachers to publish, reflect, share, collaborate, and enrich their professional presence. While publishing has long been the standard for university professors, secondary teachers do not have the same expectations placed upon them. Primarily, this is due to time constraints, but the result is that secondary teachers do not always remain current in their field. To this point, a weekly writing practice can enable teachers to stay engaged and relevant in their particular field of study in regards to pedagogy and current research. Arguably, blogging may be a less time-consuming way to publish content and begin a professional conversation that extends beyond the walls of one school. At the same time, blogging enables teachers to understand writing for a purpose and for an audience, which increases credibility when insisting on the same from students. Since reflection is one of the most important aspects of improving one’s teaching practice, the blog seems like an essential tool for every teacher. Finally, in an environment of questionable evaluation procedures for teachers, a teacher blog enables the teacher to highlight successes in the classroom and demonstrate his/her teaching pedagogy instead of being limited to one or two observations a year. I plan to utilize my teacher blog in a number of ways:

Create a dialogue for secondary Special Day Ceachers about issues that aren’t addressed anywhere else. For example, when I searched for a community of special education teacher blogs as resources, I found multiple detailed blogs for the primary grades, and moderate to severe classroom teachers. Lacking in representation is the voice of the SDC teachers at the high school level who teach common core standards to students with learning disabilities, or other eligibilities that impede progress in the general education classroom.

Share and reflect on teaching practices. While there are many issues that surround SDC teachers at the secondary level, in the end, what happens in the classroom – the experience and growth of the students – is of primary concern, just like any other teacher.

Read and write about current research in special education. Probably more than any other area of secondary education, the practices and pedagogy are researched and constantly changing. Due to the on-going paperwork involved with being a case-carrier (though I know the importance of being knowledgeable of current practices and research), this is probably the area of most potential growth in my on going development as a special educator. Therefore, my goal is to utilize the blog to create a mini annotated bibliography that is updated once a month with specific peer reviewed articles. While I should be reading more, this is a plan to begin the process.

Maintain a focus on potential interventions for both reading and writing at the secondary level. One of the struggles for English SDC teachers is trying to teach content and skills that lead to a high school diploma to students who read and write significantly below grade-level. For those who are not special education teachers, “significantly below grade level” is realistically defined as students who do not read above the primary grades. While all teachers have students who struggle with reading and writing, there is a spotlight on SDC teachers who have to teach content, but also miraculously and simultaneously increase the Lexile levels of all students.

Increase my professional online presence. The majority of my shifts in teaching practices have occurred through participating in online mediums and engaging with other teachers. This ability and opportunity has benefitted my students and me and allowed the English teacher part of me to flourish. Eventually, I would love for the special education side of me to likewise be inspired and cultivated through a sense of community and support.

While there may not be current research on the importance of blogging for secondary teachers, I will use this blog to argue that writing professionally in your field is essential to maintain relevancy in current teaching methodologies.

 

Connect with me on Twitter @SpEdTeachLove
Connect with me on Twitter
@SpEdTeachLove
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Defining, embracing, and sharing SDC culture for high school teachers.